10 reasons why rolling back ‘No detention’ policy in RTE act would be a bad idea

10 reasons why rolling back ‘No detention’ policy in RTE act would be a bad idea

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10 reasons why rolling back no detention policy in RTE act would be a bad idea. http://bit.ly/1OgmO6b #HaqBantaHai

@OxfamIndia gives 10 reason to not roll back no detention in RTE act. http://bit.ly/1OgmO6b #HaqBantaHai

The “No Detention policy”, currently an integral part of the Right to Education (RTE) Act is being considered for a roll-back.

The Central Advisory Board on Education (CABE) is recommending this roll back. Civil society organisations and educationists are opposing this move.

Oxfam India supports the RTE Act in totality and the no detention policy prescribed in it. 

We recently ran a campaign called Haq Banta Hai, asking for the complete implementation of the RTE Act. It received tremendous support and nearly 4.5 lakh signatures from across the country.

Here are 10 things to know about the no-detention policy before any recommendations are made to roll it back:

1. There is no study or research to suggest that the quality of learning of the child improves if she or he is detained. In fact, more often than not failure can be a reason for the child abandoning school based learning altogether .1

2. School-imposed grade repetition is stressful for students and is associated with reduced self-esteem; impaired peer relationships; alienation from school and a sharply increased likelihood of eventual dropout.2  

3. Grade repetition (detention) has been found to be more common in developing countries than in developed countries3 

4. Repeating a class does not give the child any special resources to deal with the same syllabus requirements for yet another year4 

5. The detention policy hits girls and children from SC and ST communities, as a majority of low achievers who have secured less than 30% have been from SC, ST and OBC backgrounds5 

6. The indirect consequences of moving from no detention to detention is likely to manifest as increase in child labour and incidences of child marriage6  as well as, perhaps a lost opportunity for many children to have at least one nutritious meal in a day. 

7. Restoring the examination system, detention policy, within the RTE framework will raise questions on some other important provisions within the RTE. For example, age appropriate admissions followed by special training for such children, whose learning level is below than required level; screening procedures for admission; and anytime admission in schools.  

8. Frank Smith: ‘The time bomb in every classroom is that students learn exactly what they are taught’. The examination system makes every child responsible for their own learning. This includes the fact that a child may often be tested on unfamiliar learning context which they have not encountered earlier as a part of the curricular content. 

9. The teachers and academic support system are often not accountable if children in their class fail or perform poorly; instead it is often the child in question who ‘fails’.

10. The worst affected from this move would be children with special ability. 

 

Written by: Ravi Prakash, Programme Coordinator, Education, Oxfam India

Illustration credit: Inchwork

________________________________________

1http://mhrd.gov.in/sites/upload_files/mhrd/files/upload_document/RTE_Section_wise_rationale_rev_0.pdf

2Jere Brophy, Grade repetition, The International Academy of Education, UNESCO 2006

3ibid

4http://mhrd.gov.in/sites/upload_files/mhrd/files/upload_document/RTE_Section_wise_rationale_rev_0.pdf

5http://www.india-seminar.com/2012/638/638_madhumita.htm

6http://www.unicef.in/Itstartswithme/childmarriage.pdf


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